Pages

Ebola Update: New CDC Guidelines

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated its guidance to protect the American public from Ebola. The updated guidance strengthens how we monitor people who may have been exposed to Ebola, how medical professionals will oversee their care, and -- when warranted -- limit their movement or activities to protect the public's health.


Learn more about the CDC's update on Ebola.

An Ebola update from President Obama

 THE WHITE HOUSE 
 

An Ebola update from President Obama
Today, President Obama spoke to the nation about Ebola -- how the Administration is responding, and what you should know.
The Ebola virus is a public health and national security priority, and the President has directed the Administration to continue to take aggressive measures at every level of government.
President Obama reiterated that, while Ebola is a serious disease, Americans need to understand the facts and be guided by the science: Ebola is not easily transmitted. And we know how to fight it.
Watch President Obama, then find out what you need to know about the Ebola virus, and how the Administration is responding.

White House Honors Affordable Care Act “Champions of Change”

On Monday, October 20, 2014 at 10:00 AM, the White House will honor "Champions of Change" who are leading local efforts to advance the goals of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). These Champions have distinguished themselves by raising awareness about ACA and helping countless Americans sign up for high-quality, affordable health insurance. The program will feature remarks from Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell and other Administration officials.

The Champions of Change program was created as an opportunity for the White House to feature individuals doing extraordinary things to empower and inspire members of their communities. The event will be live-streamed on the White House website at www.whitehouse.gov/liveYou can join the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #WHChampsTo learn more about the White House Champions of Change program, visitwww.whitehouse.gov/champions.

Vanessa Abernathy, Fairmont, NC

Vanessa Abernathy is an Enroll America Fellow. Since August 2013, she has worked on the Get Covered America campaign, spreading the word about the Affordable Care Act, providing information to consumers about the importance of health insurance, and promoting insurance enrollment. Vanessa has worked in small towns and rural areas of North Carolina, conducting door-to-door campaigns, speaking to church congregations, organizing community partnerships, and helping partners organize enrollment events. 

Niiobli Armah IV, Hyattsville, MD

Niiobli Armah IV is Director of Health Programs for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). In that role, he is responsible for managing the NAACP’s national policy and advocacy work primarily focused on childhood obesity, HIV/AIDS, and health care. Niiobli has a passion for grassroots community engagement, public health, and public policy. He has spent the last seven years working in and across industries and communities addressing urban health issues. Niiobli’s personal mission is to lead innovative work in the continuum where policy is created and where it impacts the community.

Andrew Cray, Washington, DC (Posthumously)

Andrew Cray was a policy analyst at the Center for American Progress. He is being honored posthumously for his work to connect lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Americans with comprehensive and affordable health insurance. While at the Center for American Progress, Andrew helped launch Out2Enroll, a collaborative effort with the Sellers Dorsey Foundation and the Federal Agencies Project designed to connect LGBT Americans with their new coverage options under the Affordable Care Act. Andrew also worked with the Department of Health and Human Services to ensure that the transgender community was protected in the ACA’s non-discrimination provisions and worked with various state governments to remove discriminatory exclusions from health insurance plans.

Bill Forbes, Austin, TX

Bill Forbes is a volunteer with the Get Covered America campaign of Enroll America. For the past year, he has worked in Austin, Texas, educating uninsured consumers about their healthcare options under the Affordable Care Act and putting them in touch with local service organizations that provide personal, hands-on enrollment assistance. Bill was part of the effort that helped over 734,000 Texans obtain health insurance—many for the first time in their lives. During the most recent Open Enrollment period, Bill helped organize volunteers and partners in the small- and mid-sized cities of West Texas to ensure that Texans were covered.

Joshua Gray, Mt. Rainer, MD

Joshua Gray is special assistant to the Chair of the Service Employees International (SEIU) Union’s Healthcare Division. In this role, he focuses on Affordable Care Act enrollment in African American, Hispanic, and Latino communities by building community partnerships that help close health equity gaps. Before coming to SEIU, Joshua worked to educate young people on voting and civic participation. A native of Oakland, California, Joshua graduated from Howard University in 2005.

Khadija Gurnah, Middletown, CT

Khadija Gurnah is the Program Manager for the American Muslim Health Professionals’ (AMHP) Affordable Care Act outreach and enrollment efforts. Khadija earned her Master’s in Health Management from the Yale School of Public Health. She has worked in community health, focusing on inequities in healthcare delivery, and has published papers and articles on healthcare delivery to minority populations. Under Khadija’s direction, AMHP launched the first national grassroots initiative of its kind in the Muslim American community. With a limited budget and only seven on-the-ground organizers, AMHP mobilized 81 partner institutions, resulting in thousands of enrollments and newly formed relationships between clergy and civic leaders across religious, ethnic, and racial lines.

Pat Halpin-Murphy, Ambler, PA

Pat Halpin-Murphy is the President and Founder of the Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition (PBCC). A creative and effective women’s health advocate, Pat founded the PBCC in June 1993. The PBCC extends public awareness of breast cancer and works to increase public and private funding for research and high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment. Pat’s dedication to improving the lives of women has led to dramatic legislative changes in Pennsylvania, including mandatory insurance coverage for reconstructive surgery after mastectomy, mammograms for uninsured women between the ages of 40 and 49, and extension of Medicaid coverage to uninsured women diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer. She is committed to educating the public about the Affordable Care Act and sharing the information with individuals and groups across the state.

Mark LeBeau, Sacramento, CA

Mark LeBeau is the Executive Director at the California Rural Indian Health Board (CRIHB) and a citizen of the Pit River Nation enrolled in the Illmawi Band. He has worked at CRIHB since 1999 in numerous capacities, including as a public health programs manager, proposal writer, director of the traditional Indian health program, health education specialist, and the health policy analyst. He earned his doctorate at University of California, Davis, and wrote a dissertation focused on planning and administering tribal healthcare services in California. He has served on the Pit River Election Committee, on the Pit River Health Services Board of Directors, and in Congressman Frank Pallone’s office in Washington, DC, working on American Indian/Alaska Native legislative initiatives to benefit Indian country.

Jamie Markus, Cheyenne, WY

Jamie Markus is the Library Development Manager at the Wyoming State Library. He believes that libraries are dynamic institutions that provide equitable access to a vast array of information resources, promote lifelong learning, and act as cultural incubators through their programming and outreach efforts. Jamie took it upon himself to create opportunities within the library system to have healthcare outreach and enrollment events. He also created a video about why it is important for Wyoming residents to get healthcare coverage.

Joe Pena, Miami Beach, FL

Joe Pena is the Director of Federal Relations for Miami Dade College (MDC), the higher education institution with the largest campus-based enrollment in the United States. As part of the College’s effort to disseminate information on the Affordable Care Act, Joe coordinated a college-wide initiative focused on assisting MDC students, MDC faculty, and the South Florida community to obtain high-quality, affordable health insurance. Joe helped develop a series of successful educational outreach efforts, which were hosted on multiple campuses and venues, providing key information and enrollment assistance. This initiative made a significant impact on the local community, improving the access to healthcare for thousands of residents in Miami Dade County and throughout South Florida.

Joan Serda, Macon, GA

Joan Serda is the Assistant Justice Coordinator for the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas South Central Community. In this role, Sister Joan works to promote the Critical Concerns of the Sisters of Mercy. A retired educator and administrator in Catholic schools, she decided to volunteer with Get Covered America to help those who do not have health insurance learn about the Affordable Care Act. Joan continues to work tirelessly to reach out to members of the local community about health insurance, signing up more and more Americans in central Georgia each and every day.
Cecelia Smaha, Macon, GA

Cecelia Smaha is an Associate of the Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas South Central Community. Cecelia is retired from the Georgia Department of Labor as an Employment Services Specialist, as well as from the Bibb County School System. From personal experience with illness, Cecelia knows the importance of gaining access to preventive healthcare and high-quality, affordable health insurance. Over the past 12 months, she has hosted countless events in local churches to get more Americans covered under the Affordable Care Act.

Peter Yang, Atlanta, GA

Peter Yang is a program coordinator and Certified Application Counselor at the Center for Pan Asian Community Services (CPACS). During the last Open Enrollment period, Peter led and coordinated a multilingual team to provide outreach and enrollment assistance in Georgia for the immigrant and refugee communities in 16 different languages. By collaborating with many other groups and coalitions, CPACS was able to bridge a gap in access for the community by organizing town halls, enrollment summits, workshops, community booths, press releases, translations, and various forms of media, ultimately providing assistance to over 5,000 individuals with limited English language skills.

Ebola: What you need to know


At a time when Ebola is all over the news and it's easy for misinformation to get interpreted as truth, make sure you have the clear-cut facts.

1. You CAN'T get Ebola through:
  • Casual contact with someone who has no symptoms of the disease
  • Air
  • Water
  • Food in the U.S.
Get the facts on Ebola here.
2. The only way a person can get Ebola is through direct contact with the bodily fluids of someone who is already showing symptoms of the disease.
Get the facts on Ebola here.
3. If a person does not have symptoms, they are not contagious.
Get the facts on Ebola here.
As President Obama, leadership at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other senior officials have reiterated, the chances of a widespread Ebola outbreak here in the United States are extremely low.
You can visit the CDC for more information on our response to Ebola and call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) for additional inquiries.

A Message From Sen. Bernie Saunders

The midterm elections are just weeks away and control of the U.S. Senate hinges on a handful of tight races. As a member of the U.S. Senate I can assure you that if Republicans win this November and take complete control of the U.S. Congress, it would be disastrous for the American people - in so many ways.

The Republican Party, under the influence of the Koch brothers and other billionaire families, continues to call for major cuts in programs desperately needed by working families. Unbelievably, in this very tough economy, many Republicans want cuts to Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, education, nutrition and environmental programs. They are vigorously opposed to any increase in the minimum wage or a major jobs program that would put the unemployed back to work.

But while the Republicans oppose help for struggling working families, they are fiercely in favor of more tax breaks for the rich and large corporations.

In this era of Citizens United, where billionaires have the opportunity to buy elections, the only way we can defeat the Big Money interests is by rallying the American people to stand together and fight back. And there is no better issue to unite around than the need to protect and expand Social Security. If Democrats are going to maintain control of the U.S. Senate this November, they must take a strong stance on this issue which has a huge impact on the lives of tens of millions of Americans.

Recently, my friends at Social Security Works commissioned a poll, which shows that 79% of likely voters – Democrats, Republicans, and Independents – favor increasing Social Security benefits and paying for it by asking millionaires and billionaires to pay their fair share. And those 79% are right. That’s exactly what we should do!


VOTE NOVEMBER 4TH 2014

White House Honors Disability Employment “Champions of Change”

On October 14, 2014 at 1:30 PM, the White House will honor local "Champions of Change" who are doing extraordinary work to create employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. These Champions have distinguished themselves by making workplaces more accessible to strengthen the American economy. This event will showcase these incredible leaders and their significant contributions to their communities. The program will feature U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council Cecelia Muñoz, Chair of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Jenny Yang, and other Senior Administration Officials.

The Champions of Change program was created as an opportunity for the White House to feature individuals doing extraordinary things to empower and inspire members of their communities. The event will be live-streamed on the White House website at www.whitehouse.gov/liveYou can join the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #Champs4PwDsTo learn more about the White House Champions of Change program, visitwww.whitehouse.gov/champions.

David Bartage, Falmouth, ME

David Bartage is the Plant Finance Manager for Procter & Gamble’s (P&G’s) Tampax facility in Auburn, Maine. David helped develop accessible employment opportunities at the Auburn plant’s FlexiCenter, where 40% of employees are individuals with disabilities. Since the FlexiCenter’s inception, there has been an increase in customization productivity and workforce morale across the entire plant. What started as an interest has turned into a passion for helping others and spreading the word of sustainable employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

John Ficca, Tampa, FL

John Ficca is the Director of Hands On Educational Services. Prior to this role, John taught special education to public school students of all grade levels. In 1998, with the help of the Hyatt Hotels Corporation and the Florida Department of Education, he founded Hands On to assist adults with learning and physical disabilities so that they can lead more productive and successful lives. John even returned to school to learn American Sign Language so that he could better communicate with his students who are deaf. Hands On @ Hyatt has graduated over 1,500 adults with disabilities at 32 Hyatt Hotels all across the country.

Dan Hromas, York, NE

Dan Hromas is a self-employed farmer with his own organic egg business. Dan is a disabled military veteran, having last served in Iraq in 2007. In 2013, he started his farm, Prairie Pride Poultry, to support the growing local food movement, providing fresh eggs produced by free-range hens. While Dan has encountered his share of challengeshe now runs a very successful business. Dan has established a business relationship with the area grocery stores. Now, his problem is having enough eggs to meet his growing demand.

Jenny Lay-Flurrie, Mercer Island, WA

Jenny Lay-Flurrie is Senior Director at Microsoft leading the Trusted Experiences Team (TExT)which focuses on accessibility, privacy, and online safety. The Trusted Experiences Team is at the forefront of creating positive experiences that apply technology to make a difference in the world and the lives of individuals. Jenny is also the Chair of DisAbility@Microsoft, an employee resource group focused on “enabling people to be successful regardless of ability or disability.” With the help of her team and broad community within Microsoft, Jenny leads many initiatives to empower people with disabilities both in and out of Microsoft.

Angela Mackey, Pendergrass, GA

Angela Mackey is a Human Resources Generalist at the Walgreens Distribution Center in Pendergrass, Georgia. Angela was born with cerebral palsy, and she has dedicated her career to ensuring that individuals with disabilities have employment opportunities like she had. When she served as Career Outreach Coordinator at the Walgreens Distribution Center in Williamston, South Carolina, she helped develop a program that resulted in individuals with disabilities representing nearly half of the workforce. She has also worked to make her current distribution center accessible to individuals with disabilities; now, individuals with disabilities constitute roughly 25% of employees.

Alexandra McArthur, New York, NY

Alexandra McArthur is a Senior Associate Consultant with the Taproot Foundation’s Advisory Services Team. In that role, she helps corporations develop and implement high-quality pro-bono programs to meet pressing community needs. Before joining the Taproot Foundation, she was named Ms. Wheelchair America and spent a year dedicated to promoting national workplace inclusion. She has also served as co-chair of the Junior Board for Resources for Children with Special Needs. Alexandra is an advocate for, and example of, the importance of finding methods of inclusion and opportunity for people with disabilities, particularly in the workplace.

Oswald Mondejar, Boston, MA

Oswald “Oz” Mondejar is the Senior Vice President of Mission and Advocacy for Partners Continuing Care. Oz helped develop Working Partners, a first of its kind public-private partnership between Spaulding Rehabilitation Network and the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission. Working Partners brings together government and community leaders to design policies that break down barriers to employment for people with disabilities. Previously, Oz led the New England Region recruitment program for the Social Security Administration and worked as a human resources executive in a number of industries, including manufacturing, hospitality and finance. 

John Robinson, Glenmont, NY

John Robinson is Managing Partner and CEO of Our Ability, a company owned and operated by people with disabilities to support people with disabilities. John has made it his life’s work to ensure that individuals with disabilities receive equal employment benefits and opportunities. Over the past five years, Our Ability has worked with individuals, non-profits, and large corporations to facilitate better employment outcomes for those with disabilities. Now, John is helping build a unique web portal that will help individuals with disabilities find employment.

Jennifer Rojas, Temple, TX

Jennifer Rojas is the Inclusion Manager for McLane Company. She has been in that role since November 2013 and has spearheaded the company’s first diversity program, The Spark Initiative, which focuses on disability inclusion.  The goal of the initiative is to increase disability awareness and expand employment opportunities to people with disabilities throughout McLane. Under Jennifer’s direction, McLane has increased disability inclusion by facilitating awareness training and developing partnerships with community organizations that support McLane’s goal of recruiting people and veterans with disabilities.

Tim Springer, San Francisco, CA

Tim Springer is the founder and CEO of SSB BART Group, a company with the vision of creating a world where all digital systems are accessible to people with disabilities. Under his leadership, SSB has provided digital accessibility compliance solutions for corporations, government agencies, and educational institutions. Tim views access to digital technology as a mechanism of empowering individuals with disabilities. He is dedicated to ensuring technology not only meets regulatory standards but also supports real-world use by individuals with disabilities. Today, nearly half of his company’s team of consultants are individuals with disabilities.

Same-sex marriage rights are sweeping the US. Here's where each state stands.

Latest update: On Friday, October 10, the US Supreme Court lifted a stay on same-sex marriages in Idaho, allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry in the state. Soon after, a federal court struck down North Carolina's same-sex marriage ban.
On Thursday, October 9, Nevada began issuing marriage licenses for same-sex couples following a federal injunction on the state's ban that effectively enforced an earlier ruling from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Earlier in the day, West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey and Governor Earl Ray Tomblinannounced they will not fight a challenge to the state's same-sex marriage ban, due to the Supreme Court's decision earlier in the week. As a result, West Virginia's same-sex couples should be able to marry no later than Tuesday, October 14.

The US Supreme Court on October 6 effectively legalized same-sex marriage in 11 states by deciding not to hear appeals for court rulings that affirmed gay and lesbian couples' right to marry in several jurisdictions.
The Supreme Court's decision immediately allowed same-sex couples to marry in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. Colorado and West Virginia announced they will allow same-sex marriages after the decision, with other states — Kansas, South Carolina, and Wyoming — expected to follow in the coming weeks and months as courts force them to recognize the reality of the Supreme Court and federal appeals court rulings.
Since 2013, when the Supreme Court struck down the federal ban on same-sex marriage, lower courts have followed with their own decisions effectively ending same-sex marriage bans in several states. The Supreme Court's decision in early October is just the latest in a nearly unbroken chain of victories for marriage equality across the nation.
As the decisions pile up, it can get a little difficult to track which same-sex marriage bans are legally valid and which have been overturned. This simple list tracks where each state stands.

States where same-sex couples can or will soon be able to marry

• North Carolina: The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on July 28 struck down Virginia's same-sex marriage ban. Since the Fourth Circuit Court presides over North Carolina, the decision should take effect there now that the Supreme Court on October 6 rejected an appeal on the circuit court's ruling. With a federal court's decision on October 10, same-sex marriages were allowed to begin.
• Idaho: The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on October 7 struck downthe state's same-sex marriage ban. But the state's ban remains in place until the case works through the legal appeals process. The US Supreme Court on October 10 lifted a stay on same-sex marriages in Idaho, allowing couples to wed.
• Nevada: The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on October 7 struck downthe state's same-sex marriage ban. After state officials announced they won't appeal the case further, courtscleared same-sex marriages to begin in Nevada.
• West Virginia: The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on July 28 struck down Virginia's same-sex marriage ban. Since the Fourth Circuit Court presides over West Virginia, the decision took effect there after the Supreme Court on October 6 rejected an appeal on the circuit court's ruling. On October 9, West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey and Governor Earl Ray Tomblinannounced they will not fight a challenge to the state's same-sex marriage ban, allowing same-sex couples to marry no later than October 14.
• Colorado: The Colorado Supreme Court on October 7 cleared the way for same-sex marriages in the state, after the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals on June 25 struck down Utah's same-sex marriage ban — in a ruling that spans the entire 10th circuit, including Colorado — and the Supreme Court on October 6 rejectedan appeal on the 10th circuit ruling.
• Indiana: The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on September 4 struck down the state's same-sex marriage ban. When the Supreme Court rejected an appeal, same-sex marriage became effectively legal.
• Oklahoma: The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on July 18 struck downthe state's same-sex marriage ban. When the Supreme Court rejected an appeal, same-sex marriage became effectively legal.
• Utah: The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on June 25 struck down the state's same-sex marriage ban. When the Supreme Court rejected an appeal, same-sex marriage became effectively legal.
• Virginia: The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on July 28 struck downthe state's same-sex marriage ban. When the Supreme Court rejected an appeal, same-sex marriage became effectively legal.
• Wisconsin: The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on September 4struck down the state's same-sex marriage ban. When the Supreme Court rejected an appeal, same-sex marriage became effectively legal.
Also:
• OregonPennsylvaniaIllinoisCaliforniaDelawareHawaiiMarylandMinnesotaNew JerseyNew MexicoRhode IslandMaineWashingtonNew YorkDistrict of ColumbiaNew HampshireIowa,VermontConnecticut, and Massachusetts.

States where courts overturned bans, but rulings are under appeal

• Kansas: The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on June 25 struck downUtah's same-sex marriage ban. Since the 10th Circuit Court presides over Kansas, the decision should take effect there now that the Supreme Court on October 6 rejected an appeal on the circuit court's ruling. But the state has refused to allow same-sex couples to marry until a court challenge works through the legal process.
• South Carolina: The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on July 28 struck down Virginia's same-sex marriage ban. Since the Fourth Circuit Court presides over South Carolina, the decision should take effect there now that the Supreme Court on October 6 rejected an appeal on the circuit court's ruling. But the state has refused to allow same-sex couples to marry until a court challenge works through the legal process.
• Wyoming: The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, following a lower court's decision, on June 25 struck downUtah's same-sex marriage ban. Since the 10th Circuit Court presides over Wyoming, the decision should take effect there now that the Supreme Court on October 6 rejected an appeal on the circuit court's ruling. But the state has refused to allow same-sex couples to marry until a court challenge works through the legal process.
• Louisiana: A federal judge on September 3 upheld the state's same-sex marriage ban — the first time a federal court ruled against same-sex marriage rights since the Supreme Court's decision. A state judge, however, struck down Louisiana's ban on equal protection grounds.
• Florida: A federal judge on August 21 struck down the state's same-sex marriage ban. But the state's ban remains in place until the case works through the legal appeals process.
• Kentucky: A federal judge on July 1 struck down the state's same-sex marriage ban. But the state's ban remains in place until the case works through the legal appeals process.
• Arkansas: An Arkansas judge on May 10 struck down the state's same-sex marriage ban. But the state's ban remains in place until the case works through the legal appeals process.
• Michigan: A federal judge on March 21 struck down the state's same-sex marriage ban. But the state's ban remains in place until the case works through the legal appeals process.
• Texas: A federal judge on February 26 struck down the state's same-sex marriage ban. But the state's ban remains in place until the case works through the legal appeals process.

States where same-sex marriage bans are in effect but are being challenged in court

• AlabamaAlaskaArizonaGeorgiaMississippiMissouriMontanaNebraskaNorth DakotaOhioSouth Dakota, and Tennessee.
CARD 8 OF 23LAUNCH CARDS

What have courts decided on same-sex marriage?

Since the US Supreme Court struck down the federal ban on same-sex marriages, state and federal courts have nearly unanimously rejected states' bans on same-sex marriages using similar legal rationale as the US Supreme Court.
The legal argument is that all couples, including gays and lesbians, are guaranteed the same marriage rights under the Constitution's Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses. Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote the majority opinion for the US Supreme Court's 2013 decision, concluded that the federal ban discriminated against gays and lesbians by preventing them from fully accessing "laws pertaining to Social Security, housing, taxes, criminal sanctions, copyright, and veterans' benefits." Lower courts have applied similar legal arguments to state-basedprograms and benefits attached to marriage.
The pro-LGBT rulings have come from judges appointed by both Republicans and Democrats. In Pennsylvania, for instance, a federal judge appointed by former President George W. Bush and supported by former Senator Rick Santorum, two Republicans that oppose same-sex marriage rights, struck down the state's same-sex marriage ban.
The Fourth, Seventh, Ninth, and 10th Circuit Court of Appeals have all struck down same-sex marriage bans in their jurisdictions, touting the Constitution's Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses.
The Supreme Court on October 6 rejected appeals on same-sex marriage cases from the Fourth, Seventh, and 10th Circuit Courts. It's likely the Supreme Court is waiting for a decision that contradicts the unanimous victories for marriage equality in those federal appeals courts, since a contradicting opinion would create a rift in the nation's circuit courts. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg reportedly told a Minnesota audience on September 16 that "there will be some urgency" for the Supreme Court to act if the conservative-leaning Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals allows same-sex marriage bans to stand.
With some exceptions in a handful of states, most of these court decisions have not allowed same-sex couples to immediately marry. Instead, courts have put their rulings on hold as they work through the appeals process. To find out where same-sex marriage stands in every state, check out Vox's list.